COMMENTARY: Clichés that plague Filipino movies


In Seduction, Solenn Heusaff (left) is cast as a liberated woman from Paris. In No Other Woman, Anne Curtis plays a liberated woman from New York.




While watching a Filipino movie, you may encounter scenes that are strikingly similar to others you've seen before.

Deja vu?

You're not alone. Some movie plots/story lines are so predictable, they've become clichés.

In 2007, PEP.ph listed the usual plots used by filmmakers and writers when producing an action film.

(CLICK HERE to read related article)



In 2008, PEP.ph released an article that tackled common Pinoy movie trademarks.

(CLICK HERE to read related article)


This time, the editorial team lists the usual scenes that keep popping up in locally produced movies. Here they are:


LATECOMERS. When the kontrabida or bad guys in the movie decide to wreak havoc, it's always up to the bida/good guys to solve the problem. The police show up only when the conflict is resolved. Otherwise, there would be no time for the lead stars to shine.

Seen most recently in the Ai-Ai delas Alas, Kris Aquino and Vice Ganda-starrer Sisterakas (2012)



AIRPORT RUSH. The lead star realizes (at the last minute) that s/he is in love with his/her love team partner who happens to be rushing to the airport to leave the country.


Seen in:

When I Met U (2009)
KC Concepcion's character, wearing a wedding gown, rushes to the airstrip where Richard Gutierrez's pilot character is expected to leave on an airplane.


The Reunion (2012)
The lead actors (Enchong Dee, Enrique Gil, Xian Lim and Kean Cipriano) are wearing Avengers costumes as they rush to the airport to allow Enchong's character declare his love for Jessy Mendiola



COMIC RELIEF. The best friend is tasked to provide comic relief in the movie. Oftentimes, she has no backstory and the audience knows practically nothing about her because her screen time is limited to making the leading lady shine.

There is also a growing trend for the sidekick to be a flamboyant gay character.


Seen in:

Eugene Domingo's character in Ai-Ai delas Alas's Ang Tanging Ina series

Joross Gamboa in the Mario Maurer-Erich Gonzales romantic film Suddenly It's Magic (2012)



ABROAD = LIBERATED. The other woman in the story hails from abroad, which explains why she is liberated.

Seen in:

Anne Curtis's character in No Other Woman (2011)

Solenn Heussaff's character in Seduction (2013)



TOUCH ME NOT. When an action star is fighting the enemy, he is fearless and oblivious to pain. However, when his leading lady is treating his wounds, he keeps on wincing as she wipes away the blood with a cotton ball.

Seen in majority of Pinoy action flicks.



GAGANTI AKO! In action movies, there is a scene where the bida grieves over the body of his loved one and in that moment, you know that he vows to exact revenge upon his enemies.

Seen in majority of Pinoy action flicks.



BOTHERSOME DOORS. In horror films, the stars of the movie will have problems opening a door, especially when a fearsome ghost or creature is chasing them.

Seen in Shake, Rattle and Roll films.



JUST ADD WATER. When there is a dramatic scene, there is a need for rain to suddenly appear to amp up the emotional intensity of the moment.

Seen in most drama films.


SERENDIPITY. In romantic movies, the lead actors bump into each other and fall for each other almost instantly. They will see each other again in the most unlikely places.

The characters of Coco Martin and Julia Montes cross paths several times in A Moment in Time (2013).



These are just some popular movie clichés that we’ve seen through the years. What are the others? Let us know in the comments section, PEPsters.



CLICK HERE to read PEP's COMMENTARY: Clichés that plague Filipino teleseryes

ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW


WE RECOMMEND


FROM THE SUMMIT MEDIA NETWORK


SPONSORED CONTENT


COMMENTS

Loading comments

THIS JUST IN